Irvine (949) 857-6757    |    Laguna Niguel (949) 495-2866

Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology

Patient Education

At Dental2000 we help you get a better understanding of the treatment that we propose to give to you. While you are waiting, we have multimedia presentations that explain each procedure to the fullest detail. The use of digital x-rays have less radiation and offer a key advantage in convenience compared to traditional film. If at any time you move away, we can put your x-rays on a CD for easy transfer. Our diagnostic abilities, like detecting cavities, is greatly improved because we can digitally enhance and even enlarge the x-ray images on a computer right in front of your eyes!

Emergencies:

Knocked-Out Tooth

Anytime there is bleeding, pain, or unusual swelling, you need to call your dentist or go to the emergency room of your local hospital. When a tooth is knocked out of mouth:

The first thing to do is locate the tooth. Pick it up by the top (the crown), NOT by the bottom, which contains tiny root fibers essential for re-implantation.

If the tooth is dirty, rinse it carefully in water, but don't scrub. Gently push it back into the socket, then go immediately to your dentist or a nearby hospital emergency room.

If you cannot return the tooth to the socket, or if the risk of swallowing it is too great, hold the tooth between the cheek and gums, put it in a glass of milk or salt water, or place it in a moist towel--in that order of preference.

Time is a critical factor. If you can get to a dentist within 30 minutes of losing a tooth, there is a 90 percent chance that it can successfully be implanted.

You need to see a dentist if an injury loosens a tooth but doesn't knock it out; the pulp or the nerve may have been damaged, and without treatment, the nerve will eventually die. If the tooth becomes discolored (gray, pink, or black) in the days or weeks following an injury, the tooth is probably bleeding inside, indicating the nerve has been injured. This may mean the tooth needs root canal treatment.

Bleeding Caused by an Injury

If there is bleeding after an injury, press clean gauze, a wad of cotton, or even a tissue on the spot. Although persistent bleeding is an obvious indication that professional help is needed, sometimes the injury is not as serious as it appears. If you put pressure on the spot, and the bleeding does not stop in a matter of minutes then go to your dentist or a hospital emergency room.

Extruded Tooth

If the tooth is pushed out of place (inward or outward), it should be repositioned to its normal alignment with very light finger pressure. Do not force the tooth into the socket. Hold the tooth in place with a moist tissue or gauze. Again, it is vital that the injured individual be seen by a dentist within 30 minutes.

Fractured Tooth

How a fractured tooth is treated will depend on how badly it is broken. Regardless of the damage, treatment should always be determined by a dentist.

*MINOR FRACTURE -
Minor fractures can be smoothed by your dentist with a sandpaper disc or simply left alone. Another option is to restore the tooth with a composite restoration. In either case, you should treat the tooth with care for several days.

*MODERATE FRACTURE -
Moderate fractures include damage to the enamel, dentin and/or pulp. If the pulp is not permanently damaged, the tooth may be restored with a full permanent crown. If pulpal damage does occur further dental treatment will be required.

*SEVERE FRACTURE -
Severe fractures often mean a traumatized tooth with a slim chance of recovery.

Injuries to The Soft Tissues Of The Mouth

Injuries to the inside of the mouth include tears, puncture wounds and lacerations to the cheek, lips or tongue. The wound should be cleaned right away and the injured person taken to the emergency room for the necessary suturing and wound repair.

Bleeding from a tongue laceration can be reduced by pulling the tongue forward and using gauze to place pressure on the wound area.